Beautifully Broken

Loneliness comes in many forms. It can be bestowed upon us by our peers, it can be a solace we seek, and it can also be all we’ve ever known. I’m a 26-year-old woman with a solid group of friends across the country, who’s in a happy three-year relationship, and who considers her family dear confidantes. Do I ever get lonely? Of course I do.

Nobody can evade loneliness, but author Gail Honeyman wrote to its all-consuming effects in her debut novel, Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine. She told British bookstore Foyles that the idea for her debut novel came to her after reading an article about loneliness.

“When I thought more about it, I realised that there were plenty of potential routes to a young person finding themselves in those circumstances, through no fault of their own, and how hard it can be, at any age, to forge meaningful connections.”

Honeyman’s approach isn’t all somber and sympathy though. Just as the title suggests, the main character is just fine; it’s not her that is different. It’s everyone else and the social norms that confine them that are mind-boggling. (Read Eleanor’s opinion of wedding registries, and you won’t disagree.) What Honeyman gives us is a beautiful novel that’s equal parts hilarious and heartbreaking, something that evokes laughter while you simultaneously reach for a box of tissues.

Eleanor Oliphant

Thanks for the inspo, Idea Coffee NYC!

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The More Money They Come Across…

There’s a scene near the beginning of Crazy Rich Asians when middle-class Rachel Chu walks into the family palace of her boyfriend, Nick Young. It’s her first experience with the supremely rich, and she’s presented with a silver bowl filled with water and rose petals:

“For your refreshment, miss,” [the servant] said.

“Do I drink this?” Rachel whispered to Nick.

“No, no, it’s for washing your hands,” Nick instructed.

Well obviously.

Two minutes later she’s taken aback by two stuffed native Singaporean tigers in the lobby. My parents also have stuffed game in their “entryway” … theirs just have white tails and antlers.

This is only the beginning of the lux that pours out of Kevin Kwan’s 2013 novel, Crazy Rich Asians. Kwan’s writing matches the extravagance of these Singaporean lifestyles without a lick of kitsch. If it feels over the top, that’s only because it’s in sync with the characters it describes. With all this opulence comes even more antics, drama, and insecurities (I hear ya, Biggie), but all of this proves to be hilarious, voyeuristic, and a thrill to read.

Crazy Rich Asians

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