Storied: My Cooled Desire

  • What: Fahrenheit 451
  • Who: Ray Bradbury
  • Pages: 158, soft cover
  • Genres: Classic literature and science fiction
  • Published: 1953
  • The lit: 1463390917-2400px1463390917-2400px of 5 flames

You know that feeling when one of your favorite singers comes out with an album that you so desperately want to love, but you’re just like … no … ? You keep listening in the hope that it’ll spark some kind of desire, make the head bop just a smidgen to the left, but after five tries, still … no … ? That’s how I felt about Justin Timberlake’s Man of the Woods (I fought with myself over it!), and that same feeling emerged with Fahrenheit 451.

I’ve been immensely disappointed in myself for never reading it in my 26 years. It’s not just a classic, but it says so much about literature and society. I had convinced myself (and the world had convinced me) that I would fall in love with this remarkable book when I finally got around to it.

Until I didn’t fall in love. I fooled myself into thinking my enjoyment would commence once I started understanding it a bit more. The truth is it took far too long to really be “in the know,” and even after that happened, I realized this book did very little for me. Bradbury’s classic sci-fi novel earned an extra flame for its message, but ooh ooh I was not on fire with this one.

Fahrenheit 451

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Storied: (Un)Fortunate Son

  • What: The Forever War
  • Who: Joe Haldeman
  • Pages: 365, soft cover
  • Genres: Science fiction; classic literature
  • Published: 1974
  • The lit: 1463390917-2400px1463390917-2400px1463390917-2400px of 5 flames

I’ve always said sci-fi wasn’t really my “thing.” I don’t gravitate toward it at the library. I don’t look for the best sci-fi lists. I just click with other genres better. Enter the picture: Kyle, my partner of three years (whaaat?) and a huge sci-fi nerd. When we started dating, he was reading a gargantuan from Stephen King about a virus that wipes out the world.

Yeah. Not quite my thing.

But it is Kyle’s. Apocalyptic warfare? Intense technological enhancements? Human-erasing bugs? That’s him. I’ve read exactly one sci-fi novel in our time together (Station Eleven1463390917-2400px1463390917-2400px1463390917-2400px1463390917-2400px). So it was only natural that when I closed the cover on Eleanor Oliphant a few weeks ago while sitting next to BF that he suggested I read one of his favorite sci-fi novels: The Forever War. I relented, but he reminded me how I always say I’m going to read one of his books and don’t (truth) and convinced me that the story’s undertones of the Vietnam War, in which the author served, would captivate me.

Ugh he knows me so well.

Fine. For BF, I will read sci-fi. The things you do for love.

The Forever War

Amid Kyle’s massive sci-fi collection.

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Guest Reviewer: A Toe-To-Toe Annihilation

By: Nick Coffman

Jeff VanderMeer‘s novel Annihilation caught on the adapted screenplay train rather quickly. Just four years after being released to sci-fi lovers in hardback, the story is being shown on the silver screen, with Natalie Portman on board. The book is the first in the Southern Reach trilogy and tells the story of four women who set off to explore Area X, a remote area filled with mystery. As members of the twelfth expedition, Lena (Portman) and the others try to determine what has caused Area X to appear. Searching for answers, they are instead stricken with paranoia of what may lurk beyond each corner.

It’s only natural that movies and the books that they’re the based off will be compared to one another. Therefore, it’s time to go toe to toe with Annihilation: book versus movie.

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This Book is on Fire

The Specs

As a book connoisseur (some might now even call me a critic), I’m pretty easy to please. When you read finance material all day at work, you’re happy to absorb any form of creativity. Very seldom have I found a book I can’t finish or that fails to light the tiniest of sparks. But finding a full-on scorcher is even harder. That type of material is the stuff of J.K. Rowling, Ann Patchett, and Emily Giffin. I might enjoy a lot of books, but I can’t hand out five flames for just anything. Therefore, I am happy to give you Big Little Literature’s first ever inferno.

Maybe it’s because this stellar novel was published on my birthday, Feb. 14, but I instantly connected with Lincoln in the Bardo. I read it during a particularly painful flight experience to and from Denver. Counting delays, this totaled about 10 hours, but with Lincoln, it felt like two. This story will surely dominate every Best of 2017 list; it’s already dominated mine.

George Saunders, one of Time‘s most influential people in 2013, began writing his multigenre and first novel after hearing the tale of Abraham Lincoln paying multiple visits to the crypt of his son, Willie, after he died at the age of 11. What he created wasn’t just a fictional story about life after death but a creative venture that took me into the past and into another world.

Lincoln in the Bardo

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